How to perform a Simple Remote Viewing Session?

How to perform a Simple Remote Viewing Session?
As advanced remote viewing takes lost of training and time if one wants to achieve it, it is far easier for a beginner to perform a successful simple remote viewing experiment. Below you can read guidelines for a very basic experiment.
One experiment includes only trying to see a picture sealed in some non-transparent envelope. Some friend of yours may select few interesting photos with strong lines, shapes, and colors, than paste them on white paper, and seal them in separate envelope – nothing should be seen from the pictures. He/her should number the separate envelopes, starting with “1”.
Pictures should not be too complex, but strong enough to hold the interest to the subconscious mind of the viewer. It is also recommended if the photos are as different as possible, so it is easier to read often partial descriptions by a beginner remote viewer when the session is over.
When you feel ready for the session, choose one of the envelopes, sit in a quiet and peaceful place (a table is recommended with few sheets of paper and a black-ink pen), and start your session by writing “Target 1” (or whichever picture you have chosen) at the top of the paper. This is your “ready to go” signal. You should then relax, trying to perceive signals/impressions with your mind from the photo in the envelope.
You need to remember the following: Remote viewing impressions must prevail all the mental noise that is constantly present in human’s minds. Mental noise is usually consisted of thoughts, memories, guesses, worries, distractions, deductions, etc., and keeps our brains “buzzing”. Sorting it out from the real remote viewing impressions is the hardest part of the process.
Here are some guidelines: Clear, sharp, bright, and static mental images are practically always noise, and therefore a “disinformation” may occur. This may sound counterintuitive, but remember that it is named remote viewing. However, not everything we see during a RV process is necessarily true. Very often, the mental imagery is created by our conscious mind with an unsuccessful attempt to explain more subtle things deeper in the mind.
The real remote viewing signals are often fuzzy, indinstinct and vague. After few sessions, you will start feeling and noticing the difference between the noise and signal. This is why it is important to make sketches on what you are perceiving. Quite often sketches that do not make much sense when you first make them can be actually accurate descriptions of the target. So, record every bit of perception you can – sounds, smells, colors, or tastes. Lines and shapes can also be very important. Your perceptions will be probably very fragmentary; you may never “see” the full picture of your target, but what you will describe, draw, or feel will make the greatest sense afterwards.
This experiment should last for five to ten minutes. When you think you have gotten everything you can from the picture/target, just write “End” and the time of ending at the bottom of the paper you have used. No further marks on your written record should be made – this is named the “transcript” of the RV session.
AT this point, you can open the envelope and see the target, comparing it to your impressions. It is very important to be honest with yourself: if something matches it is OK, if not – will be better the next time. Don’t try too hard to anyhow find some connection between your impressions and the real photo. This is called data-fitting and is actually a form of making excuses for your fail to “see”. If you are not able to see where you’ve been wrong, it will be harder to do it better the next time.
At this time, you may now open the envelope to see what the target was and compare it to your session transcript to see how you have done. Be honest with yourself – where something matches well, give yourself credit. But don’t try too hard to find a correlation between what you “viewed” and the target photo. This is sometimes called “data-fitting,” and is essentially a form of making excuses for yourself; it can get in the way of you improving your remote viewing abilities. If you can’t acknowledge where you’ve been wrong, it’s harder to learn how to do things right the next time.
The further principle that is very important while learning RV is that you have to be willing to fail to succeed. Try things, take intuitive trick or trust some impressions you are not sure about – all of this will bring you experience that is needed to make the difference between correct and incorrect information.
And finally: keep your records so you can follow your process. Always keep your transcriptions together with the target photo that goes with it. Date and write down your name on everything you do related to remote viewing, and file it in easy accessible place.

As advanced remote viewing takes lost of training and time if one wants to achieve it, it is far easier for a beginner to perform a successful simple remote viewing experiment. Below you can read guidelines for a very basic experiment.

One experiment includes only trying to see a picture sealed in some non-transparent envelope. Some friend of yours may select few interesting photos with strong lines, shapes, and colors, than paste them on white paper, and seal them in separate envelope – nothing should be seen from the pictures. He/her should number the separate envelopes, starting with “1”.

remote vieiwng taget

Pictures should not be too complex, but strong enough to hold the interest to the subconscious mind of the viewer. It is also recommended if the photos are as different as possible, so it is easier to read often partial descriptions by a beginner remote viewer when the session is over.

When you feel ready for the session, choose one of the envelopes, sit in a quiet and peaceful place (a table is recommended with few sheets of paper and a black-ink pen), and start your session by writing “Target 1” (or whichever picture you have chosen) at the top of the paper. This is your “ready to go” signal. You should then relax, trying to perceive signals/impressions with your mind from the photo in the envelope.

You need to remember the following: Remote viewing impressions must prevail all the mental noise that is constantly present in human’s minds. Mental noise is usually consisted of thoughts, memories, guesses, worries, distractions, deductions, etc., and keeps our brains “buzzing”. Sorting it out from the real remote viewing impressions is the hardest part of the process.

Here are some guidelines: Clear, sharp, bright, and static mental images are practically always noise, and therefore a “disinformation” may occur. This may sound counterintuitive, but remember that it is named remote viewing. However, not everything we see during a RV process is necessarily true. Very often, the mental imagery is created by our conscious mind with an unsuccessful attempt to explain more subtle things deeper in the mind.

The real remote viewing signals are often fuzzy, indinstinct and vague. After few sessions, you will start feeling and noticing the difference between the noise and signal. This is why it is important to make sketches on what you are perceiving. Quite often sketches that do not make much sense when you first make them can be actually accurate descriptions of the target. So, record every bit of perception you can – sounds, smells, colors, or tastes. Lines and shapes can also be very important. Your perceptions will be probably very fragmentary; you may never “see” the full picture of your target, but what you will describe, draw, or feel will make the greatest sense afterwards.

This experiment should last for five to ten minutes.

When you think you have gotten everything you can from the picture/target, just write “End” and the time of ending at the bottom of the paper you have used. No further marks on your written record should be made – this is named the “transcript” of the RV session.

AT this point, you can open the envelope and see the target, comparing it to your impressions. It is very important to be honest with yourself: if something matches it is OK, if not – will be better the next time. Don’t try too hard to anyhow find some connection between your impressions and the real photo. This is called data-fitting and is actually a form of making excuses for your fail to “see”. If you are not able to see where you’ve been wrong, it will be harder to do it better the next time.

At this time, you may now open the envelope to see what the target was and compare it to your session transcript to see how you have done. Be honest with yourself – where something matches well, give yourself credit. But don’t try too hard to find a correlation between what you “viewed” and the target photo. This is sometimes called “data-fitting,” and is essentially a form of making excuses for yourself; it can get in the way of you improving your remote viewing abilities. If you can’t acknowledge where you’ve been wrong, it’s harder to learn how to do things right the next time.

The further principle that is very important while learning RV is that you have to be willing to fail to succeed. Try things, take intuitive trick or trust some impressions you are not sure about – all of this will bring you experience that is needed to make the difference between correct and incorrect information.

And finally: keep your records so you can follow your process. Always keep your transcriptions together with the target photo that goes with it. Date and write down your name on everything you do related to remote viewing, and file it in easy accessible place.

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